Report Card Handbook

Livonia Public Elementary Report Card Parent Handbook

Introduction

The Elementary Report Card Committee began its work in the fall of 2000 with two purposes. One of our purposes was to create a new report card to accurately reflect the instruction occurring in the elementary classroom and the second purpose was to clearly communicate student progress to parents. The committee consists of teacher representatives from each of the elementary schools, parents, elementary principals, and the Director of Elementary Instruction.

The committee read and discussed current research articles and books on the most effective assessment and reporting systems. The committee devoted two years to developing and expanding their knowledge of student reporting systems. National assessment expert, Dr. Thomas Guskey, worked with the committee to provide guidance and suggestions. In addition, he presented the elements of effective grading practices and reporting student learning to all elementary staff.

In the third year, the committee began the examination of multiple reporting devices statewide and nationally. This allowed them the opportunity to analyze curricular needs while developing the most effective way to report student achievement.

Following the research study, the committee created the essential parts of the new report card. Once this task was completed, the committee proceeded to pilot the new reporting device in all schools at every grade level.

The report card may be revised at the end of each school year and will continue to undergo revisions as necessary to ensure it meets current needs. 3

Criteria Used to Mark the Elementary Report Card

The elementary report card is intended to help parents/guardians and students understand how well a student is meeting the grade level standards by acquiring the skills, knowledge, and attitudes designated for his/her grade level. The report card reflects your child?s achievement in learning grade level objectives. Progress, product, and process are the three criteria used as evidence to evaluate student achievement.

Progress criteria focuses on how much students have gained over time from their learning experiences. Examples of progress criteria include student folders/ portfolios of student work, classroom observations, and pre and post assessments.

Product criteria focuses on what students know and are able to do at a particular point in time. Examples of product criteria include reports, projects, presentations, tests, and other culminating demonstrations of learning.

Process criteria does not focus on results, but on how the student attained and accomplished results. Examples of process criteria include journals, reading and writing notebooks, homework, teacher observations, and quizzes.

A single measure or indicator of student learning can be flawed or unreliable. Therefore, teachers use multiple sources of information when evaluating student achievement and marking the report card. 4

Understanding the 4, 3, 2, 1 Evaluation Key

The symbols

"+" and "-"

are not added

to the

4, 3, 2, 1 evaluation key.

The evaluation key contains an explanation of each numeric

mark used for curriculum areas and each letter mark used for

other areas of the report card.

4

High achievement of grade level objectives: Consistently applies concepts and/or skills to meet grade level expectations.

Students achieving at this level demonstrate superior academic performance, competency of subject matter knowledge and application of this knowledge to real-world situations.

These students:

? Can extend their understanding by making meaningful, multiple

connections among important ideas of concepts and provide

supporting evidence for inferences and justification of

solutions

? Apply concepts and skills to solve problems using appropriate

strategies

3

Meeting grade level objectives: Generally applies concepts and/or skills to meet grade level expectations.

Students achieving at this level usually demonstrate solid academic performance, competency of subject matter knowledge and application of this knowledge to real world situations.

These students:

? Can usually extend their understanding by making meaningful, multiple connections among important ideas or concepts and provide supporting evidence for inferences and justification of solutions

? Usually apply concepts and skills to solve problems using appropriate strategies

5

Progressing toward grade level objectives: Developing an understanding of concepts and/or skills; practicing and improving.

2

Students achieving at this level are approaching acceptable performance, but have not achieved it. Their work reflects a partial understanding of essential knowledge and skills. They also experience partial success in tasks using this knowledge or skills.

These students:

? Demonstrate partial understanding of basic concepts and skills

? Make simple or basic connections among ideas, providing limited supporting evidence for inferences and solutions

? Apply concepts and skills to routine problem-solving solutions

1

Not yet demonstrating grade level objectives: needs time and practice; relies on one-to-one support.

Students achieving this level demonstrate limited essential knowledge and skills. Their work reflects a need for additional instructional opportunities to achieve a basic understanding of essential knowledge and skills. Students may require assistance or extended time in applying knowledge or skills.

These students:

? Demonstrate minimal understanding of essential concepts and skills

? Occasionally make obvious connections among ideas, providing minimal evidence or support for inferences and solutions

? Have difficulty applying basic knowledge and skills

Note: The letters "NE" indicate the item is Not Evaluated at this time 6

Understanding The symbols C-U-S-N-W marking system.

Consistently Students achieving at this level can be observed demonstrating these behaviors all of the time.

Usually Students achieving at this level can be observed demonstrating these behaviors most of the time.

Sometimes Students achieving at this level can be observed demonstrating these behaviors occasionally.

Not Yet Students achieving at this level need time and practice and/or rely on one-to-one support.

Area of Weakness Students achieving at this level can be observed demonstrating these behaviors inconsistently and/ or is an area of concern.

Note: The letters "NE" indicate the item is Not Evaluated at this time

List of Comments

A numerical list of comments is offered to assist teachers in selecting behaviors students exhibit. These numbered comments are available for each curriculum area as well as for the "Life and Learning Skills" section. Teachers are limited to two comments per area for each marking period when using the computer-generated version of the report card.

Teacher/Student Perspective Narrative Comments

In an effort to encourage increased interaction and better two-way communication between teachers and parents, this section was included for teachers to describe students?learning and seek parental involvement. In this section, the communication between home and school focuses on students?strengths, challenges, goals and action plans for each marking period. This section is individualized and provides parents with a holistic view of their child. It 7

contains clear, concise, and helpful information, focusing on student achievement, challenges, and plans for improvement. Teachers may work collaboratively with students in developing goals and action plans. The Report Card Committee included this section as a way of giving more specific and individualized information to parents. 8

Subject Area Marking Period Sections

Life and Learning Skills

The Life and Learning Skills section was intentionally listed first on the report card because of its significant contribution to both the social and academic success of students. The statements that appear on the report card are listed in italic type below. The descriptors under each statement are provided for further explanation and clarification.

Respects Others

? Accepts other? opinions and differences

? Shows kindness, concern, empathy for others

? Listens as others are speaking

Works Cooperatively*

? Able to work with others to accomplish a task

? Able to be in a supportive and/or lead role

Uses appropriate problem solving/decision making skills

? Uses words to solve problems or differences

? Accepts constructive feedback and utilizes it effectively

? Uses common sense to solve problems

Assumes responsibility for self

? Brings all needed materials to school (i.e. supplies, lunch, homework)

? Accepts consequences for choices

? Communicates with parents via planner, notes, permission slips

? Stays up to date with assignments even when absent

Follows rules*

? Follows established rules and procedures in classrooms, playground, lunchroom and those included in the Student Handbook

Is a self-directed learner*

? Sets goals and works towards achieving them

? Is able to manage work/free time effectively

? Uses both short and long term plans to complete academic assignments and improve behavior

*Kindergarten teachers mark only these three statements on the report card. 9

Listening and Speaking

Listening is a processing skill. It involves actively attending, interpreting words, constructing meaning and responding.

Speaking involves selecting ideas, organizing thoughts, adapting ideas to an audience and purpose, and using language to clearly communicate these ideas.

Reading

Reading at earliest levels includes learning about letters and sounds, and concepts about print. Early readers learn about reading through exploration of books both individually and in groups with teacher support.

Reading is more than reading words. Reading is a thinking process that includes demonstrating comprehension, interpreting and critiquing text. „omprehension?means getting the gist of a text. It is being able to use various strategies to understand the text as a whole, and to support thinking with evidence from the text. Students make connections between parts of a text, among several texts, and between texts and other experiences. They make extensions and applications of a text, and examine texts critically and evaluatively.

The processes of learning to read and write are taught simultaneously at each grade level.

Early writers experiment with a variety of marks on paper, beginning with letter-like forms and pictures, eventually moving toward more conventional forms.

Writing

Early writers experiment with a variety of marks on paper, beginning with letter-like forms and pictures, eventually moving toward more conventional forms.

Writing is a process through which a writer shapes language to communicate effectively. The development of writing occurs through a series of initial plans, multiple drafts, informed feedback and responses.

Purpose, audience, and context contribute to the form and substance of writing as well as to its style, tone, and stance.

"Having control of the conventions and grammar of the English language means having the ability to represent oneself appropriately with regard to current standards of correctness (i.e. spelling, punctuation, paragraphing, capitalization, subject-verb agreement). Usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats." (LPS Essential Core Curriculum and Objectives for Language Arts, 2004)

The selected performance statements on the report card for reading, writing, listening and speaking were chosen because they embody the LPS Essential Core 10

Curriculum and Objectives for Language Arts. These statements reflect the shift in thinking and understanding related to what it means to be a literate individual in an evolving society.

Mathematics

Experiences with hands-on manipulative materials provide support for learning new mathematical concepts at all grade levels. These experiences provide support for more complex and abstract mathematical reasoning.

We need mathematically literate citizens who participate in and become an integral part of an increasingly technological society. Our students must be given opportunities to recognize the value and pervasiveness of mathematics in all aspects of life. We need to support children in gaining a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts so they can utilize a variety of strategies in order to solve problems.

Criteria for each evaluated area were derived from curriculum objectives contained in the LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Mathematics.

Science

Citizens in the twenty-first century will need to effectively apply a range of scientific skills and knowledge to understand their world and communicate about it.

The specific science content areas on the report card were chosen as a set of skills that combine knowledge, concepts, facts, processes, and the ability to use language to articulate and communicate these ideas.

Criteria for each evaluated area were derived from curriculum objectives for each grade level contained in the LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Science.

Social Studies

Students should have knowledge of history, geography, civics, economics and methods of social studies inquiry. This knowledge will enable them to develop effective positions, participate in discussion on public issues and take constructive actions for the public good.

The specific social studies content areas on the report card were chosen to cover content (history, geography, civics, and economics), thinking skills (analyzing data), understanding Core Democratic Values, and citizen participation.

Criteria for each evaluated area were derived from curriculum objectives for each grade level contained in the LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Social Studies. 11

Art

The three statements selected to evaluate student performance give an overview of a student? progress and reflect LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Art.

Artistic Development: Demonstrates understanding of art objectives.

Application: Shows care with technique and materials.

Behavior: Listens, follows directions, and conducts self appropriately.

Information Technology – 5th Grade

The three statements selected to evaluate student performance give an overview of a student? progress and reflect LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Information Technology

Skills: Demonstrates an understanding of concepts and standards

Application: Shows care with techniques and equipment.

Behavior: Listens, follows directions, and conducts self appropriately.

Music

The three statements selected to evaluate student performance give an overview of a student? progress and reflect LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Music.

Musical Development: Demonstrates concepts/skills through singing, movement, and/or playing instruments.

Participation: Demonstrates best effort through performance in groups and/or individual activities.

Behavior: Listens, follows directions, and conducts self appropriately.

Physical Education

The three statements selected to evaluate student performance give an overview of a student? progress and reflect LPS Essential Content and Objectives for Physical Education.

Fundamental Skills: Demonstrates appropriate motor skills, fitness skills, and/or object control skills.

Participation: Demonstrates best effort individually and in groups during physical activity.

Behavior: Listens, follows directions, and conducts self appropriately. 12

Livonia Public Schools

15125 Farmington Road

Livonia, MI 48154

Andrea Oquist

Director of Elementary & Special Programs

Revised October 2010